The Super-Duper Fan Fiction Crossover Challenge!

super_duper_fan_fiction_crossover_challenge

As you can see, I’m horrible at naming things, including challenges/contest. 😛 But does that surprise anyone?

Rhetorical question…

For some reason, I really, really like crossovers. It’s always fun to see my favorite characters come together in a way they probably never will in real life. I honestly haven’t written one, unless you count the Avengers’ Isle series thing, but I’d like to, if I could come up with a good idea. For those of you who don’t know what a crossover is, it’s basically fan fiction combining two different universes, e.g. The Avengers/Chronicles of Narnia, or something more book-ish, like the Hobbit/The Hardy Boys. (BTW, the second one was a random, on the spot one I made up…)

So, on to the challenge/contest. Basically, you are to write a fan fiction crossover. (Duh… *facepalm*) Since I will be “judging”, the fandoms must be ones that I know, from movies or books that I’ve watched. I’ll give you a brief list. Pick two, or if you think of a different one you’d like to do, comment and ask. I can’t properly evaluate characters from movies and books I don’t know.

Here’s the list:

Movies

The Avengers (Please keep in mind that I haven’t watched Iron Man 1/2/3, The Incredible Hulk, Thor 2, or Cap 2. No spoilers for those, please. 😀 )

Finding Nemo

Frozen

Tangled

Brave

Toy Story 1/2/3

The Chronicles of Narnia

Night At The Museum 1/2/3

National Treasure 1/2

The Princess Bride

The Lego Movie (??? If you do this one, that will be at the top of my list to read. 😛 )

Books

The Sherlock Holmes stories/novels

The Bible (Please don’t feel obligated to do this one, but I would enjoy reading it all the same…)

Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew (These apparently qualify as one, although I do not agree…)

Dr. Seuss (Eh-he, eh-he… *imagines Avengers/Dr. Seuss crossover*… *dies laughing*)

Frankenstein

The Tale of Despereaux

The Word Changers

Indian in the Cupboard

*end “brief” list*

Ah, so now that we have that over with, we can continue. You do not have to do a book and a movie, I just wanted to provide plenty of choices. If you don’t see something you’d like to do, just ask?

Feel free to do multiple crossovers and submit all of them.

Speaking of submitting… After you finish writing your story, post it on your blog, if you have one (if you don’t, borrow a friend’s, or comment and ask me… hopefully I’ll think of a solution…). Then post a link in the comments here so that I can find your post. The deadline shall be… February *goes to see if it’s a leap year* 28th. That gives you a little over a month. If I don’t have any submissions, I’ll extended the deadline, reboot the contest, whatever.

Now, prizes. If you submit a crossover (or multiple ones 😉 ) you are automatically guaranteed a link/shoutout in the post on the deadline. I will pick the winner based on plot, level of difficulty (e.g., a Lego Movie/Avengers crossover would get more points than a Frozen/Tangled crossover), how close the characters are to the original, and probably a few other things I come up with… And the winner’s story will be posted on here, with the author’s permission.

Now, go start wr–

Wait, what? *whispers with invisible friend Bob* Bob here says I haven’t made this hard enough! He wants me to make it more fun! And what better way to do that than…

Add a twist!

Now, for the sake of your sanity, this twist won’t be required, but you’ll definitely earn some bonus points if you do it. 😉 So here’s the twist. To earn those special bonus points, you must include a quote from a third fandom (as in, not one of the two in your crossover). It must be one of these ten quotes:

  1. The Avengers: “So that’s what it does.”
  2. Finding Nemo: “I am a nice shark, not a mindless eating machine.”
  3. The Princess Bride: “You fell victim to one of the classic blunders – The most famous of which is ‘never get involved in a land war in Asia’ – but only slightly less well-known is this: ‘Never go in against a Sicilian when death is on the line’!” (Or if you would rather you can use “Anybody want a peanut?” or “Hello, my name is [insert character name]. You killed my father. Now prepare to die.”
  4. Tangled: “Frying pans! Who knew, right?”
  5. Frozen: “Oh, look at that! I’ve been impaled!” (Please don’t make this disgusting if you use it…)
  6. The Lego Movie: “A house divided against itself… would be better than this.”
  7. Night at the Museum: 1 – “Let’s do this, people! And… animals! And… weird faceless puppet creatures!”  2 – “You know, two words come to mind when I hear you talk. “Delusional” and “weirdo”. And if I had to say a third, “goofy.” Just goofy.”  3 – “What, have you never seen a gorgeous woman before… who could be a model if she didn’t love pizza so much.”
  8. National Treasure: 1 – “It’s a big blue-ish green man… with a strange-looking goatee… I’m guessing that’s significant.” 2 – “Sir, please dismount the banister.”

I stopped at eight because somehow I already had more than ten quotes… Go figure.

So, let’s recap, because that was long and rambling…

  1. Find two fandoms, and (optional) choose a quote to include.
  2. Write your crossover!
  3. Post your story on your blog (or someone else’s).
  4. Put a link to your story in the comments here.
  5. Repeat!

Please, please participate! The more participation, the more likely it will be that I’ll do this again! Have fun!

 

Chocolate Books Tag

I was tagged for this, uh, tag, by Sarah over on Lights and Shadows. Basically, you match up books with chocolate, which I don’t even eat, so I’m relying on the explanations… 😉 This is my first tag, so… I hope I’m doing this right. 😀

1. Dark chocolate (a book that covers a dark topic):

The Merciful Scar. It’s a beautiful book about redemption and love, and a girl – I say girl, but she’s twenty-something – trying to overcome cutting.

2. White chocolate (a favorite light-hearted/humorous read).

Oh, this one is easy. Because New Kid Catastrophes Book 1: TJ And The Time Stumblers by Bill Myers is a book you cannot read without laughing. Seriously. I mean, everyone who reads this should go buy this book. (Should’ve said that when it was free the other day) I mean, with “goofballs Tuna and Herby from the 23rd century” and TJ Finkelstein, and Hesper Breakaheart, and “one disaster after another”… Okay, so maybe the description doesn’t quite do it justice, but let me just say that Tuna and Herby have some interesting inventions that create some very interesting situations, like Chad, the most popular guy in school, turned into a goldfish and in the Finklestein’s toilet… And I mean, with quotes like “‘Run for your lives; it’s a crazy girl riding a piano!'” how could it not be a hilarious book? TJ is such an awesome narrator as well. Okay, I am officially adding this book to my list to review…

3. Milk chocolate (a book with a lot of hype that I’m dying to read).

Well, okay, let’s back up. I’m not on much social media and such, so I’m not sure what has a lot of hype and such, but I’d have to say the second book in The Lunar Chronicles, Scarlet. And I’m only saying the second book because I’ve already gotten to read the first book… Go Cinder!!!!

4. Caramel chocolate (a book that makes me feel all gooey inside).

If by gooey you mean that it makes me want to squeal because I’m so happy, then I can answer this one. If not… well, I don’t really feel gooey… But No Place Like Holmes by Jason Lethcoe just made me want to jump up and down while spinning in a circle and squealing with happiness. But you might not feel that way if you’re not familiar with the Sherlock Holmes stories and can say “I REMEMBER THAT FROM THAT STORY!!!!”. And the sequel, The Future Door, was pretty good, it’s only problem is… well, all the time-travel stuff is kind of hard to wrap your mind around…

5. Waferless Kit-Kat (a book that surprised me).

A book that… surprised me. Bad or good? One of each, hehe… Bad surprise: The Eagle of the Ninth, by Rosemary Sutcliff. For some reason I was expecting this book to be epic, but it just felt really slow. Too much narrative summary. Don’t get me wrong, it had an awesome plot, just a little too much explanation. I may or may not have just read it because the series had “Britain” in the name… 😀 Good surprise: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin. This was in the same stack as The Eagle of the Ninth. But it was like a game of Clue with characters and a twist ending and I was even keeping notes and I still totally failed but my guess was right but only because of my super crazy logic…. If you haven’t read it, I highly recommend it, and you can read my review here.

6. Snickers Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups (a book I’m going nuts about).

Ew, nuts… 😉 Hang on, let me go ask someone… Okay, so apparently I’ve been talking about Thor and The Princess Bride and my other awesome favorite movies too much to have bored anyone to death by talking about a favorite book… *goes to check kindle* Wait… wait… skip the Kindle, I want my paperbacks! Ugh, this is hard!!!! Okay, I have to say either The Discovery by Dan Walsh. And, in case you couldn’t tell, my White Chocolate book, too.

7. Hot chocolate with mini marshmallows (a book you turn to for a comfort read).

Ugh, this one’s hard, since I don’t reread books very often. I have so many new books that it just doesn’t happen! But I guess Invisible, the first Ivy Malone mystery from Lorena McCourtney. Mostly because it was really funny, ironic, and most of the other books I’d use here I’ve already mentioned. 😉 You can read my review here.

8. Box of chocolates (a series I feel has something for everyone).

Dare I be classic? The Chronicles of Narnia! And in case that’s just too easy, the Antarctica books by Peter Lernagis. Seriously, there’s only two books, so I’m not sure if that counts as a series, but it was awesome! 😀

So, that was fun! I’m going to tag Icedmocha34, erinkenobi2893, and awkwardlyartistic.  What do you think of my choices? Have you read any of these, and do you agree? Comment below!

Out of Place – Part Two

The conclusion to the story of fantasy, time travel, and the differences between the past and the present. Click here for Part One. I hope you enjoy, and please let me know what you think in the comments below.

It took us a while to get out of the woods, but when we did, we both were astonished. In front of us, to our left and in the distance, we saw a town that looked a lot like the pictures I’d seen of small colonial-period villages. Its small buildings, cobblestone streets, and horses trotting down the streets, pulling buggies, really surprised me. Kayley gripped my hand tightly.

“What’s going on here?” she whispered fearfully. I couldn’t help but feel a stab of fear, too.

“Let’s try to figure this out,” I said, trying to sound brave. “Why don’t we check out the town?”

“Okay,” Kayley replied. She followed me reluctantly down a dirt path, which the residents probably called a road. We passed a small two-story farmhouse where a lady was taking down her laundry. She spotted us and gasped.

“Girls!” she cried. “What are you thinking, going around in those?” She rushed over and handed both of us a skirt. “Keep them, and make sure to wear them!” The lady walked back to her laundry, muttering to herself and glancing back at us.

I glanced over at Kayley, who was slipping on the skirt over her jeans. It reached all the way to her ankles. I glanced down at my jeans. “What’s wrong with these?” I asked, insulted.

Kayley nudged me. “Don’t you get it? We’re in a different place or time or something. Girls don’t wear jeans here, they have to wear…”

“Skirts,” I finished, wrinkling my nose at the thick, heavy fabric in my hands. Sighing, I slipped it on. “Let’s go,” I told Kayley. We started off on the path to the town.

When we reached the town, we strolled along the sidewalk, trying not to stare at everybody and everything. We were getting quite a few stares and disapproving looks ourselves. I guess it was because of our mismatched clothing. We certainly did look out of place among the women with huge powdered wigs, and the men with long ponytails or wigs. The men and boys were dressed in knee breeches and horribly stiff-looking shirts, while the women and girls were wearing ankle-length dresses.

“This is so weird,” Kayley whispered in my ear.

“Yeah,” I whispered back. “It feels so awkward.” I grimaced when a snobby-looking woman glared at us. “Let’s go in this store.” I pushed Kayley into the building. An old gray-haired man stood behind the counter, rearranging the penny candy. He looked up as we entered the store, raising his eyebrows at our clothes.

“Millie!” he called into the back room. A tiny lady with gray hair pulled back in a tidy bun stepped out. A look of shock flew across her face when she saw us.

“Girls, do you need dresses?” she asked hurriedly. “I have two that you can have.” She did appear to be close to our size. I opened my mouth to turn her down anyway, but Kayley jabbed me with her elbow.

“Sure, we’d love some,” she agreed, giving me a warning look. I groaned inwardly. The lady led us to the back of the store, which was apparently where the elderly couple lived. The lady pulled out two checkered dresses and handed them to us. “You can change behind that curtain,” she told us, pointing. We both obeyed, ducking behind the long piece of fabric used as a makeshift curtain. I slipped into my dress, wishing I didn’t have to wear it. I spent most of my time in jeans or shorts, and I hated wearing skirts and dresses. I couldn’t help sending an unhappy glare in Kayley’s direction. Unfortunately, she didn’t notice. She was too busy swirling the dress’s long skirt.

“I love this dress!” she exclaimed. “I always wanted to wear an old dress!”

I rolled my eyes and snorted. “You’ve always been the dressy type.”

Kayley laughed. “Come on, Syd, let’s go. We need to find out how to get home.” She pulled me out from behind the curtain.

“Right,” I agreed.

The old lady smiled at us. “Good,” she told us. “You girls look much better now.”

I gave her my most adorable smile, the one my mom calls my oh-you’re-so-sweet smile. Kayley calls it my fake-sincere smile. Probably because I only use it when I have to fake being sweet. “Oh, thank you so much!” I struggled to keep my smile pasted on. I was disgusted. “I was wondering, what town is this? We’re new here.”

“I could tell,” the old woman said, her eyebrows wrinkling. “It’s Canyon Creek.”

My eyes widened, and so did Kayley’s. That was the same town where our grandparents lived! But this was way different. Something weird was going on.

Kayley recovered from her surprise first. “Thanks,” she said. “I think we’ll look around in the store. Thanks again!” she called over her shoulder. I followed her, shaking off my shock.

The two of us “shopped around” a little, until Kayley suddenly pulled me outside. She led me down the street, going back the way we came. “What’s up?” I asked curiously when we were out of earshot of most of the townspeople.

“I saw a date on a newspaper,” Kayley told me. “It said that this is 1799!”

“Really?” I asked, astonished.

My cousin nodded. “We should go back to the cave,” she suggested. “I think those bats had something to do with us changing times.”

Sometimes Kayley’s a lot smarter than me. I think those Sherlock Holmes stories that she’s always reading help a lot. “Sounds good,” I told her.

We reached the cave and entered it, but not without a slight bit of hesitation first. I had only taken a few steps into the cave when Kayley stopped me. “Let’s pray,” she suggested. I nodded, and we grabbed each other’s hands, bowing our heads.

“Dear Lord Jesus,” I prayed out loud. “We have no idea what’s going on, but we know that You do. Please fix this mess. Amen.” I looked up and made eye contact with Kayley. “Let’s go,” I stated. Kayley nodded.

We walked into the cave together. The blackness quickly enveloped us. I trailed my hand on the wall to help us find our way through, and to keep us from running into the walls. The rough sound of my hand on the rock echoed in the cave. The thunk made when my fingertips hit each wooden beam stood out. Other than that the cave was eerily silent.

“Wait,” Kayley said. I jumped not expecting her voice. “I think I still have my flashlight.” I hear her rustling through her skirts to the normal clothes still underneath. “Here it is!” she exclaimed. She clicked the flashlight on and light flooded the cave. It took a few seconds for my eyes to adjust. We went around a corner, and the light lit up bunches of bats clinging to the ceiling. Kayley and I instinctively hit the ground, and we heard the bats flapping around above us and leaving the cave. Their squeaks eventually faded away.

Kayley and I stood up. Kayley shown her flashlight around the cave, illuminating numerous stalactites and stalagmites that had reappeared.

“Yes!” I cried. Kayley hugged me ecstatically. I noticed a bright spot on the wall and walked over to it. My flashlight, still on, was shining on the cave wall. I picked it up. It was a little beat up, but, other than that, it was fine.

I heard Kayley laughing. I walked back to her. “What’s up?” I asked, confused.

She grinned. “We’d better change out of these dresses.”

I laughed. “We probably should.”

~~~

We continued exploring the woods and the cave throughout the rest of that summer. We always brought our dresses with us. Just in case.

Writings About Writing – Those We Love, Part One

Sherlock Holmes. Nancy Drew. Black Beauty. Charlotte and Wilbur. Velvet Brown. Despereaux. Yes, I’m just listing some of my personal favorite characters.

How did all of these authors do it? How did they make characters that aren’t perfect, but are so well loved? Sherlock Holmes, one of the most famous detectives of all times, was often arrogant, broke the law, and had a cocaine addiction. Black Beauty… well, he was a horse. Wilbur was, let’s face it, not the sharpest knife in the drawer. And a pig. That too. Velvet Brown was a skinny, sickly kid who liked to play with paper horses cut out from magazines. Despereaux. He was a mouse. Again, skinny and sickly.

So how come we love Wilbur from Charlotte’s Web and hate Napoleon from Animal Farm? (I’m not the only one who didn’t like Animal Farm, am I?)

Basically, I’ll be discussing these questions and more in this little series.

What are some of your favorite characters? Do they have flaws? Have you made any characters that you absolutely loved, or hated? What made you like them so much?

Book Review: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

Westing-Game-Cover

This book was amazing.

If you like mysteries, Sherlock Holmes, and (I quote from the dedication) “puzzle-mysteries”, then you should read this book. It was first published in 1978, so it’s kind of old. And it’s wonderful. It makes me think of a huge game of Clue, except… different. Very different. And funnier.

I was taking notes during the story, trying to figure it out before the characters did, but, although I did on a little of it, I didn’t get all of it. There were so many amazing “Aha!” moments while I was reading. The characters are wonderful, and I really liked how we got to step into the minds of so many different characters. There weren’t so many characters that you got lost, but there were enough to keep things interesting.

And the funniness. Yes. There were so many things that were simply implied that just made you laugh. Here’s one of my favorite funny moments and quotes *NOT A SPOILER*:

“…the same male nurse who chased Otis Amer out of the hospital for sneaking up on a nurse’s aide carrying a speciment tray and shouting, ‘Boom!'”

Ah, yes. Just think about that for a while. You’ll get it.

All in all, I definitely recommend this book to everyone. It’s a great mystery, whether you like murder or not, and it’s really, really intriguing. I had a lot of trouble putting it down, and it took me less than a day to read. 😉 So read it, it’s awesome. If I could write mysteries like that… *sigh*

Read it!